2014/07/10fd0_fitness_31SaTlxBsGL._SL160_

Adults with eosinophilic esophagitis should consider a diet change

Dietary elimination is a successful method of treatment for adults with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), according to a new study in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association.

“By eliminating specific foods from patients’ diets, symptoms improved in 71 percent of patients, and endoscopic appearance improved in 54 percent,” said lead study author, W. Asher Wolf, MD, MPH, and co-author Evan S. Dellon, MD, MPH, from the division of gastroenterology and hepatology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine. “These strong results support dietary elimination therapy as an effective treatment for adults suffering from EoE.”

Researchers conducted a retrospective cohort study using the University of North Carolina EoE database from 2006-2012. Subjects were 18 years of age or older and diagnosed with EoE based on consensus guidelines. The study analyzed two diet elimination plans. For the first therapy — targeted elimination — patients underwent evaluation with skin prick testing, and foods that had a positive reaction, as well as any foods identified by patient self-report as being possible triggers regardless of the severity of response, were eliminated. For the other diet prescribed — the six-food elimination diet — dairy, wheat, eggs, soy, nuts and seafood were eliminated from the patient’s diet regardless of skin-prick test results.

Sixty-eight percent of patients who received targeted diet elimination experienced symptom improvement, compared with 78 percent of those who followed a six-food elimination diet plan. For those subjects who responded to six-food elimination diet, one food (or food group) was added back every six weeks, and endoscopy was repeated. Eggs and dairy were found to be the most common triggers, both impacting 44 percent of patients.

Importantly, because this study included patients who failed steroid therapy, the overall study population likely represents harder to treat EoE patients. The success of dietary elimination in this population indicates its utility for therapy in patients resistant to steroids.

Because EoE is an allergen/immune mediated condition, dietary elimination therapy has been extensively studied in children and is now a well-established modality in pediatric patients. Until recently, the utility of dietary elimination was unknown in adults. However, evidence is mounting; a June 2014 Gastroenterology meta-analysis2 reported that dietary interventions are effective in producing histologic remission in both pediatric and adult patients with EoE.

While the current treatment of swallowed corticosteroids acts topically to reduce esophageal inflammation, no corticosteroid is FDA approved, not all patients respond and, when discontinued, EoE almost always recurs. As such, there is a growing need for a new treatment for patients with EoE.

Further research should emphasize which factors can predict effective dietary therapy, to target therapy to patients most likely to respond.

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Diet And Weight Loss News — Sciencedaily
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This holiday season I’ve been working extra hard to get fit even before new years. I want to feel healthy and happy in the body I’m given, so why not take ca…

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Comments

    • Evelyn Clark
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    The type of push-ups she is doing are right. These are harder and build
    more muscle 

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    • MilesLover03
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    get into Zumba I promise you’ll enjoy it and lose weight not even trying
    to. I lose 18 or more pounds from it

    View Comment
    • Hilarynicolee
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    Awesome job Chelsea! Don’t listen to the people tell you that your doing
    things wrong, as long as it’s working for you then you’re fine! :)

    View Comment
    • BeautyLiciousInsider
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply
    • SimplyIzzy13
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    You are so perfect! <3

    View Comment
    • laurensblogx
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    Just letting you know Special K is not healthy for you – It’s highly
    processed!

    View Comment
    • extremfacts
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    you´re all too fat to do just one exercise right…

    View Comment
    • C'est Daisy
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    these are not pushups…

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    • jessbeautybabe
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    Chelsea looks the fittest out of all the friends

    View Comment
    • Tatiana Ragland
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    she must not workout very often cause was doing alot of the workout moves
    all wrong but at least shes trying

    View Comment
    • BeautyByFer
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    2 days left to enter my 72pc makeup set giveaway!

    View Comment
    • ShyGamer
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    Thanks for the workout. I’ve been getting tired of the one I’ve been using,
    it hasn’t been helping me much, but this has. Thank you so much <3 But I
    agree the way you did it was different. But eh, everyone has their own
    way. 

    View Comment
    • eddiekul7
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    Wear yoga pants next time!

    View Comment
    • avarosebeauty9
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    love you chelsea! amazing video!!! (:

    View Comment
    • Blues Dogma
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    What type of push ups were you doing druing strength modified or standard?

    View Comment
    • StretchAllDayErrDay
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    Just finished my daily workout to see this!

    View Comment
    • Jessie Welch
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    I was just trying to think of ways to be healthier earlier today. This
    video really motivated me! Thanks Chelsea! <3 you! 

    View Comment
    • Christina Ford
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply

    Poor girl in the pink seemed totally ignored and left out

    View Comment
    • S. Laramore
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply
    601 of 623 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Good Activity Monitor – Feel the need to leave this review, November 13, 2013
    By 
    S. Laramore (Columbus, OH United States) –

    This review is from: Polar Loop Activity Tracker (Sports)
    First of all I purchased this directly from Polar because I wanted it as soon as possible. I also purchased the H6 chest strap (wish I would have gotten the H7 for equipment). Setting this thing up was very easy. The button and scrolling through the menu is intuitive and easy.

    I’ve owned a Jawbone Up (for 5 months and have replaced it 3 times now). There were a few things that I liked about the Up but here’s why I chose the Polar Loop:

    1. I only want to wear one thing on my left wrist–I need a watch, this foots the bill. I wish it had the date but I’m happy with it.
    2. Like that I don’t have to plug it into the phone jack on the iphone (4S) for it to sync. No little cap to lose.
    3. I can quickly check my progress with a couple punches of the button. Instant feedback.
    4. Thing I like most about it is that it works well with my HR monitor. Sometimes I take long walks–when I don’t have time for that I like to do an elliptical or jog. By using an HR monitor I can track towards my progress without putting in the steps.
    5. Polar is a reputable company and I’ve used their products in the past. I had no reservations about giving them a shot on this new product.
    6. Waterproof/Shower-proof (although I’ve noticed that the water hitting it activates the menu).

    Cons:
    1. App isn’t quite as slick as the Up one. I think over time this will get better. I love how the UP app shows a column chart of sleep, activity, and food intake…it does a poor job of taking into account exercise though.
    2. Battery life is around 5 days. Not quite as long as the Up (which tends to lose it’s battery life the longer you use it).
    3. Wish it had the vibration alarm that the Up has. Not a deal breaker for me though and probably would kill the battery life faster.
    4. VERY minor annoyance here but I’m never a fan of proprietary charging cables. I travel a lot and it’s just one more thing to carry. I’ll deal with it 🙂

    Honestly, I think this is the best activity monitor out there right now. The time, waterproof, integration of HR monitor makes it my best choice; maybe it’s yours too. Hope this helps someone.

    11/20 update:

    I don’t understand why people are voicing frustration over this product. I emailed Polar (told them I had bought a H6 monitor and wanted the H7 monitor). They immediately credited my account and I bought a H7 monitor (through Amazon). I just got it today and it pairs easy–I paired it within 2 seconds without even looking at the directions. Granted there’s a little bit of tech savviness needed but individuals need to do a little research.

    The fact of the matter is that this is the only activity monitor that allows you to use a HR monitor. Does it have all of the features of every other competitive alternative; no. Is the app perfect yet, no. I trust polar I’m just amazed of these negative or mediocre reviews–be fair in your reviews is what I ask. I (as a consumer) trust and read every review–I wanted to add my 2 cents.

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    • GregTR
    • July 19, 2014
    Reply
    246 of 257 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Only activity tracker with HR data for workouts, November 13, 2013
    By 
    GregTR (Fort Worth, TX) –

    This review is from: Polar Loop Activity Tracker (Sports)
    I’m a Polar fan who trains and uses Polar heart rate monitors for my running, cycling, swimming, hockey and other exercises. I was looking for something that would track my everyday activities outside of exercises. The premise is simple, it calculates your basal metabolic rate based on gender,weight, height and age and estimates your movements based on accelerometers.

    The primary measurements it will provide on the unit are:
    – number of steps
    – a required level of low/moderate/high intensity activities to meet the daily recommended activity goal
    – number of calories burned as the day progresses
    – time of day

    This does not sound much more than your average pedometer but things get more fun an interesting when you upload your data to Polar Flow and you start using a Bluetooth Smart HR transmitter when exercising.

    Once the data is uploaded it will show your daily activity level in 5 zones (laying down, sitting, standing, walking, jogging) which the top 3 are what count as “active time”. It not only gives you a total time spent in each zone but a down to the minute breakdown of how it was achieved. It’s nice for me to notice just how long the stretches are in front of the monitor at work and how little I get up to do something. It also gives you an “Inactivity Alert” when it notices stretches of 1 hour or longer of low activity during the day. You better get up and move your butt around to avoid the orange triangles!

    The unit also measures how long you were asleep which is an easy no-brainer method to track sleep, way easier than trying to track it on my own.

    The best part is when you put a HR strap on for a workout as you can see how hard and how long you actually worked out. It shows your normal 5 HR zones and gives you a percentage breakdown as to where you were during the workout. It also gives you an entire HR chart for the length of the workout. Ultimately workouts come down to intensity times duration and it is irrelevant how slow or fast you were going. It is also a great way to track activities that don’t lend themselves to the traditional measurement of distance over time like running or cycling. I use it to track my public skating sessions and a friend of mine uses it to track indoor soccer games, a place where you are not allowed to wear a watch but a small bracelet like the Polar Loop is acceptable. When you have the unit linked to a HR strap it will also show your current HR on the Loop as an additional display mode.

    So I think the ideal market for the loop is
    a) People who are just starting to get more active and would like an initial peek into their lifestyle and how little they actually move during the day.
    b) Active athletes who’re looking for a super simple way to get their sleep times logged
    c) People who are active in sports that can vary in duration and effort and are hard to gauge in your standard metrics of speed and time (baseball, soccer, hockey, skating, volleyball etc.)

    For me it was a real eye opener that outside of my active exercising of 8-10+ hours a week I barely move and I hardly get over 5,000 steps in a day.

    The Flow web site is still in constant development as is the Flow App for the iPhone and hopefully it will get better with time. As of today, with the latest 1.0.2 version of the FlowSync app it finally sync correctly to the website, before it had issues with resetting the Loop after each upload but that finally has been fixed. Once the initial kinks get fixed and worked out I’ll be sure to update my review and rating.

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    • PorscheOscar
    • July 20, 2014
    Reply
    227 of 237 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    If you know what you’re doing this is 5 star, January 13, 2014
    By 

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Polar Loop Activity Tracker (Sports)

    First, don’t buy this unless you’re getting the H6 (for iPhone) or H7 chest strap. This review is based on using the Loop and chest strap. Currently the price for both can be had for about $150 on Amazon if you hold out for a sale. Considering the price of the Nike Fuelband at $150 and the Fitbit Force at $130, the chest strap for the Loop is a no-brainer and must have all at once.
    Why? because the Fitbit Force and Nike Fuel Band units will never use heart rate data, a deal-breaker for a legit exercise tracker. A $130-150 pedometer like the Fitbit and Fuel band are simply too expensive in my opinion if they exclude heart rate tracking. At $150 and higher you’re well into heart rate monitor pricing and well past e-pedometers.
    Let’s talk about sleep. Some have opined that the Fitbits are better for this. Total nonsense. If you’re using the chest strap, the Loop provides *minute by minute* tracking of your sleep. You can even see if you experience PAC and PVC’s during deep sleep on your chart using the Polar Flow website. Do Fitbit Force users know what PAC/PVC is? Of course not because their devices don’t use heart rate at all. Basically when you awake you remove the chest strap, synch the Loop to your laptop (very fast compared to Nike) and you’ll have a graph showing you (A) how long it took for you to get into deep sleep, (B) how many calories were burned during sleep,(C) what your resting heart rate is during deep sleep and (D) what the heart rate is during light sleep, (E)how many minutes or hours are spent deep sleep,(F) if you are restless sleeper as it shows when your breathing pattern was interrupted and (G) how many PAC or PVC’s you experience in a night. If you think that wrist movement alone like on the Fitbit during sleep is all you need to analyze your sleep then have been misled by Fitbit reviewers. This aspect of the Polar loop and chest strap alone makes it worth buying. You would have to check into a Hospital Sleep Center to have this kind of data analysis at your finger tips. For which they would bill your insurance thousands of dollars.

    Some have complained that they don’t know how to mark the begining or end of a workout when viewing the data on the Polar Flow website or App. Simple: get dressed for your workout and make sure the very last thing you do before you begin is to put on the chest strap (and hold the Loop up to it for it to connect). Dab a little water under the chest strap’s blue tooth transmiter, it speeds up the linking. When you are done with the workout and have recovered for a few minutes remove the chest strap. This stops the data recording of heart rate. The Loop will continue to record your foot steps however. That workout is now a “feed”. When I log on to Polar Flow I typically have two feeds a day. One is 7-8 hours for sleep. The other is 1.5-2.0 hours for workouts. In essence putting on and removing the chest strap acts as a stop watch. After your workout its good to leave it on until you’ve recovered your heart rate back towards the resting heart rate zone, or where you were when you began workout. Analyzing this data is important as it shows how quickly you can recover from exertion. As you workout more, this recovery time should begin to shrink. For example a very out of shape person climbing stairs will often be panting for a while afterwards. Since buying the Loop I wear the chest strap frequently to gauge how many calories are burned and the level of heart activity for common activities like walking in the mall or the supermarket. For example a long five hour shopping trip resulted in typical heart rate of 80 bmps and 1,300 calories burned (my resting heart rate for sleep is 55-60 bpms). This shopping trip was enough to meet my minimum activity goal for the day. On the Polar Flow website under “Diary” it showed 130% of the daily goal achieved and it also displayed the average for that week of 120%, thereby demonstrating short-term consistency towards a long-term goal. There were also hyperlinks for each calendar day that took you to the graph for that day’s workout when the chest strap was used.

    Important: by using heart rate tracking you can see how hard those 10 miles you just hiked actually were. The Fitbit and Nike will only show the steps hiked but what if those 10 miles were a mix of hard uphill steps where you had to expend much more energy? Well without heart rate tracking it registers them all as the same. What if you walked those miles at a brisk pace? Only the Loop and chest strap combination records that data, and it does so with the most accurate alogrithm for calories burned in the exercise industry.

    I’m Android user, no there’s no app yet. No big deal I can use use the Polar Flow website from my PC or Laptop to get at the data for exercise or sleep sessions until then. The Android app will come at some point so no point throwing out the baby with the bath water because of impatience. The issue is that…

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