2014/06/3576d_exercise_default

Saturated fat intake may influence a person’s expression of genetic obesity risk

Limiting saturated fat could help people whose genetic make-up increases their chance of being obese. In a new study, researchers from the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University identified 63 gene variants related to obesity and used them to calculate a genetic risk score for obesity for more than 2,800 white, American men and women enrolled in two large studies on heart disease prevention. People with a higher genetic risk score, who also consumed more of their calories as saturated fat, were more likely to have a higher Body Mass Index (BMI), the ratio of body weight to height.

“We already know there are certain genes that interact with dietary fat and affect BMI,” said senior author José M. Ordovás, Ph.D., director of the Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory at the USDA HNRCA and a professor at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. “In the current study, we analyzed dozens of variants of those genes and other genes frequently associated with obesity risk and saw that, while total fat intake was related to higher BMI, people who were genetically predisposed to obesity and ate the most saturated fat had the highest BMIs.”

The findings, which account for possible confounding factors such as age, sex, and physical activity levels, are published online ahead of print in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Ordovás and colleagues hypothesize that people who have these gene variants that predispose them to obesity may be more sensitive to saturated fat, which is found mostly in fatty cuts of meats, including beef and pork, as well as butter, cheese and other high-fat dairy products.

“Little is known about the mechanisms that might explain the role of saturated fat intake in obesity,” said Ordovás, who is also a member of the Genetics and Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics graduate program faculty at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts University. “Some clinical models suggest that saturated fat might interfere with activity in the the part of the brain that lets us know we’re full, in addition to a few studies in people that suggest a diet high in saturated fat interferes with satiety. More research is needed to know whether those findings would also apply to gene function.”

Genetic risk score could be useful in identifying people who are predisposed to obesity and could ultimately lead to personalized dietary recommendations. “If further research can clarify a relationship between obesity related genes and saturated fat, people with higher scores would have even more incentive to follow advice to limit their saturated fat intake as part of an obesity prevention strategy,” Ordovás said.

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Build bigger shoulders without destroying your joints! http://athleanx.com/x/build-big-shoulders-safely Building bigger shoulders can often come at a price i…
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<p>Question by skycat: Do you exercise?
What kind of exercise do you do?

Best answer:

Answer by jus call me lynn =]]
yes, yoga, or running, and sit ups. =]]

What do you think? Answer below!

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Comments

    • Fadil Karim
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    Great demonstration Jeff! Should we not do side lateral raises either then?
    

    View Comment
    • WaqarDepp
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    Call him “Achmed”….;)

    You know, Jeff and Achmed. Sounds familiar, right? ;)

    View Comment
    • Mistrusts
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    Call him Boner

    View Comment
    • GOAAAAAAT
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    hey jeff! my shoulder blades stick out pretty bad. I think I have winged
    scapula. any tips? I do rear delts and flies and don’t do chest as much 

    View Comment
    • DFKnightmare
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    X-Ray

    View Comment
    • NeverWalkAlone1394
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    Nice going Jeff! You’re such a swell dude!

    P.s. name the skeleton Jeff Bones ;)

    View Comment
    • Tony Madrid
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    a name for the no gainz joe? how about helter skelter or busta brown

    View Comment
    • Rok XY
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    name him mike chang

    View Comment
    • Robert Carr
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    So would wide grip barbell upright rows put the elbows in a bad position
    too?

    View Comment
    • PETER LUDWINSKI
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    THANKS FOR THE TIP ATHLEAN-X!

    BTW – Call Him “BoneZo!”

    View Comment
    • Ben David
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    0:39 – Holy Shit this dude is huge
    0:49 – *turns to the side* Wtf? 

    View Comment
    • Excalibur
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    Most people know about behind the neck press, but what about side lateral
    raise? Doesn’t it put the rotator cuff in the same position? If you think
    about it moving heavy this movement is not in our evolution, as it is very
    inefficient.

    View Comment
    • calisthenics4ever
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    So anybody correct me if i’m worng… Standard barbell OHP –> good
    Behind the neck OHP -> bad ??

    View Comment
    • sure222
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    soccer and lacrosse

    View Comment
    • ~*~lindzybinz~*~
    • June 4, 2014
    Reply

    i do all he muscle machines and losts of other stuff made to work my muscles 🙂 and i love the olyptical trainer

    View Comment
    • Quizard
    • June 5, 2014
    Reply

    Just a brisk 30 minute walk these days.

    View Comment
    • his best girl
    • June 5, 2014
    Reply

    elliptical – 45 minutes a day, 550-600 calories burned
    strength training 30 minutes a day (don’t know calorie burn)
    5 days a week

    View Comment
    • stahlcyndi
    • June 5, 2014
    Reply

    I try but sometimes it can put me in the bed for days..Fibromylagia. If I am having a good day I ‘d be out working in the yard.Plus I have a big exercises ball to do stretches with..

    View Comment
    • Sara C
    • June 5, 2014
    Reply

    truthfully no but i would like to start

    View Comment
    • sunflower528
    • June 5, 2014
    Reply

    Yes, I do a yoga class once a week. I go swimming once a week and walk for an hour every day. Occasionally I play badminton. When the weather is sunny I like to go for a long cycle.

    When I do these activities, I find that I am able to clear my head of mundane day to day things and think about the things that really are important to me. As I walk or cycle, I experience a feeling of joy and peace. I get these feelings to a greater extent while exercising (and after exercise) than I do at other times.

    View Comment
    • Flower
    • June 5, 2014
    Reply

    I do.
    I love jogging and I go to the gym whenever I can.

    View Comment
    • Ankleboots
    • June 5, 2014
    Reply

    yes i walk where ever ig, i walk to town and back, its £1-50p bus fare £3-50 taxi, so i walk for those prices i could buy some nice lipstick, or nailvarnish, instead, i have a dog so we go out 6 times a day each walk lasts 40 mins.

    View Comment
    • KoRn_COB
    • June 5, 2014
    Reply

    Yes, I lift weights 4 times a week, and I run about 25 miles a week.

    View Comment

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