2014/05/51113_exercise_default

Dialysis patients’ anxiety, depression linked to physical impairments

With the rate of chronic kidney disease on the rise among older Americans, researchers seeking to improve patients’ quality of life studied a group of adults undergoing hemodialysis and found their higher rates of depression and anxiety could be associated with their impaired physical exercise capability and reduced daily physical activity, according a new study published online by the Journal of Renal Nutrition.

The researchers studied 72 relatively healthy maintenance hemodialysis patients and compared them to 39 healthy adults who were not on dialysis. They found significantly higher rates of anxiety and depression among the dialysis patients, than among the adults who were not on dialysis. They also found the dialysis patients suffering from depression and anxiety had the greatest impairments in physical exercise performance and daily physical activity.

“Adults undergoing dialysis often have less daily physical activities than other adults, but little was known about what, if any, effect this reduced activity had on their mental state,” said Joel D. Kopple, MD, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) lead researcher. “Our study found an association between reduced daily physical activities and depression and anxiety. Also, the capacity to perform physical exercise was diminished in these patients. These findings provide a strong rationale for studying whether increased daily physical activity can reduce depression and anxiety among adults undergoing dialysis.”

Each person enrolled in the study took walks, climbed stairs and engaged in other physical activities so that researchers could determine their physical abilities. The researchers gauged their depression and anxiety using standardized tests and found 43% of the dialysis patients had anxiety and 33% suffered from depression. In comparison, only 2.5% of the adults who were not on dialysis had anxiety and only 5% of them suffered from depression.

Approximately one in 10 Americans has some form of chronic kidney disease, and the incidence of chronic kidney disease among people ages 65 and older more than doubled between 2000 and 2008, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Hemodialysis is a life-preserving treatment for hundreds of thousands of Americans with kidney failure. It is a medical procedure to remove fluid and waste products from the blood and to correct electrolyte imbalances. This is accomplished using a machine and a dialyzer, which is sometimes described as an “artificial kidney.”

“Research is important to improve the quality of life of patients undergoing dialysis,” said Dr. Kopple. “With the growing population of people undergoing dialysis, this research is growing in importance.”

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

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Physical Therapist demonstrates three basic exercises for tennis elbow. www.maddenpt.com Madden Physical Therapy 5425 Jonestown Road Harrisburg, PA 17112 717…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

<p>Question by Spirito: My back hurts should I exercise?
Yesterday I exercised and today my back hurts, can I exercise recovery workout anyway today?

Best answer:

Answer by Chuma Joy
I exercise a lot! and sometimes I just skip a day or two, or just forget and think “what harm can it do?” . Well the pain I get the next day, kinda proves a point. What I’m trying to say is that when u start exercising, u should never stop. The pain you’re are getting on your back, is because your muscles were getting used to all the exercising. So exercising will only help than do more harm. So yes exercise! But don’t over do yourself. Hope I helped ; )

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Comments

    • Ivana Istvanic
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    Thank you – as I remember month when could hardly dress myself!!

    View Comment
    • gc0619
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    Amazing! Amazing! Amazing! After many trials and effort to cure my tennis
    elbow pains, eventually I found a better and easier method, it contains a
    set of manual vacuum pump with plastic heads which can suck a bubble our
    from one’s pain spot on one’s arm; if one leaves the pump up about 2 min.
    at lifted height is about 1/2 inch from the original skin level; and then
    release it by removing the vacuum only lifting the top lid, The pain was
    gone about 95%!!! My lord. You can buy the same set of this magic tool
    from local Chinese store or at the websites, but the pictures are shown at:

    http://baike.baidu.com/picview/1727822/1727822/0/62667cd0a7ae59eea1ec9c34.html#albumindex=0&picindex=3

    Cupping is a good easy principle to make use of mechanical ventilation
    negative pressure inside the cup, the cup selected adsorption sites
    (acupuncture points or pain spots). 

    View Comment
    • Andrew M.
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    Thanks for the excellent tips. Truly appreciated!

    View Comment
    • xStandardTalent
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    I read to do tennis elbow rehab excercises everyday, is this correct?

    View Comment
    • Kevin Henderson
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    Thank you

    View Comment
    • Sabrina Herbert
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    Best video!

    View Comment
    • Shelby Michaud
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    I agree with Scott Wallace. In our clinic we always start active and
    eccentric since studies show that those exercises benefit the client most
    initially. Supination and pronation exercises with a hammer would most
    likely just inflame an already inflamed ECRB tendon. 

    View Comment
    • Weldon Clears
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    Hi Madden, those are good exercises and I thoroughly believe in exercising
    away the pain in fact I invented a device called Elbow Ease that by using
    it reduces and in most cases gets rid of the pain. 

    View Comment
    • choff56
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    You do 30 reps, but how many sets of these do you do ?

    View Comment
    • Scott Wallace
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    where are all the eccentric exercises??? all the evidence shows not to do
    any concentric exercises like you are demonstrating

    View Comment
    • Madden PT
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    If you have true lateral epicondylitis, they should help…let me know!

    View Comment
    • Kibatsume1
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    are these exercises safe for people that have both carpal tunnel and tennis
    elbow?

    View Comment
    • Robert Konečný
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    Please when I have to practice these exercises before practicing after
    exercise?

    View Comment
    • Madden PT
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    It will be best to find another specialist in your area…

    View Comment
    • Zac L.
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    When I saw the hammer, I got pretty scared..

    View Comment
    • Madden PT
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    These exercises are light and basic. As with any exercise, the best
    application is on a gradient. If you are taking the self treatment
    route…let pain be your guide.

    View Comment
    • Madden PT
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    You are welcome.

    View Comment
    • Madden PT
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    Welcome Sedat.

    View Comment
    • R Cannon
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    Hi there I messages u a week or so ago w a hip issue. I have been working
    thru exercises as I have been for many years before this ever happened. I
    am in the process of finding some additional expert help I live in port st
    licked Florida and the area leaves a lot to be desired. I have purchased an
    inversion table …. What do u think of them as a whole?

    View Comment
    • Madden PT
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    Should be fine to do these…clearance from the doctor?

    View Comment
    • William White
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    I wonder if it could be a little cyst.

    View Comment
    • dan trevi
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    Thanks a lot for the helpful vids. It’s like visiting a sports therapist,
    only less expensive.

    View Comment
    • Carol
    • May 29, 2014
    Reply

    After exercise, give your muscle time to heal. Do not overdo exercise. This will only cause your injury.

    View Comment

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