2014/05/f1569_fitness_default

Poor Diet Before Pregnancy Linked with Preterm Birth

Poor Diet Before Pregnancy Linked with Preterm Birth

University of Adelaide research has for the first time confirmed that women who eat a poor diet before they become pregnant are around 50% more likely to have a preterm birth than those on a healthy diet.

Researchers at the University of Adelaide’s Robinson Research Institute investigated the dietary patterns of more than 300 South Australian women to better understand their eating habits before pregnancy.

It’s the first study of its kind to assess women’s diet prior to conception and its association with outcomes at birth.

The results, published in The Journal of Nutrition, show that women who consistently ate a diet high in protein and fruit prior to becoming pregnant were less likely to have a preterm birth, while those who consistently ate high fat and sugar foods and takeaway were about 50% more likely to have a preterm birth.

“Preterm birth is a leading cause of infant disease and death and occurs in approximately one in 10 pregnancies globally. Anything we can do to better understand the conditions that lead to preterm birth will be important in helping to improve survival and long-term health outcomes for children,” says the lead author of the paper, Dr Jessica Grieger, Posdoctoral Research Fellow with the Robinson Research Institute, based at the Lyell McEwin Hospital.

“In our study, women who ate protein-rich foods including lean meats, fish and chicken, as well as fruit, whole grains and vegetables, had significantly lower risk of preterm birth.

“On the other hand, women who consumed mainly discretionary foods, such as takeaway, potato chips, cakes, biscuits, and other foods high in saturated fat and sugar were more likely to have babies born preterm,” Dr Grieger says.

“It is important to consume a healthy diet before as well as during pregnancy to support the best outcomes for the mum and baby,” Dr Grieger says.

“Diet is an important risk factor that can be modified. It is never too late to make a positive change. We hope our work will help promote a healthy diet before and during pregnancy. This will help to reduce the number of neonatal deaths and improve the overall health of children,” she says.

Dr Grieger will present her research findings at the upcoming SA Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian Society for Medical Research during ASMR Medical Research Week on Wednesday 4 June.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Adelaide. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Original story here.
Diet And Weight Loss News — Sciencedaily
— Courtesy “Science News Daily” (ScienceNewsDaily.com) <p> <p>Question by Daniel: Help with a fitness routine?
I want to try and get in really good condition for the start of the new football (soccer) season. I am already quite fit and have started to do some sprints, however i don’t know the best way to do these. Could you please help me to develop a fitness routine that can be completed in six weeks, that will help me improve my fitness. Thanks, please ask if you need any extra informationFat Loss.
Yes i can run distance and i recently ran a 10k race, when i have trained using long distance in the past i have usually ran around 3.5 – 4miles. I don’t currently do any other training apart from my fitness and football. I don’t really want to include any weight training into this training program, however i would be interested in building muscle in other ways, such as sit-ups, press ups etc. I don’t have a fixed diet, but i do try to eat healthily, eating lots of carbs and protein. I try to train around 3-4 times a week for about 2-3 hours each time, but i would like to increase this. Any help with a six week plan would be greatly appreciated, thanks very much.

Best answer:

Answer by sarah Smith
No problem I will put together 2 different plans for you so you are able to choose which you feel is right for you. The first plan will focus on HIIT. This type of training allows you to train at a higher intensity for a shorter period of time, so your workouts are shorter but push you to your max so you get great results. I think this is a great way to improve fitness in a short period of time.
The 2nd will focus on distance running. These workouts are longer as you are focusing on distance rather than speed but is also effective. Diet is VERY important!…. If your diet isn’t correct the training will be nowhere near as effective.

I APPOLOGISE NOW FOR THE LENGTH OF THIS POST/ANSWER
—————————————————————————————————————————————————-
Plan 1- HIIT Training
The following program can take you from HIIT beginner to HIIT advanced in 6 weeks.
– phase 1 starts with a work:rest ratio of 1:2 in for a total workout time of just under 17 minutes.
-Phase 2 the work:rest ratio is 1:1 with a workout time of 18.5 minutes.
-In Phase 3, the rest ratio is 2:1 with a workout time of 20 minutes.

The suggested time of each phase can be modified to suit your personal fitness level. If you need to spend more than two weeks at a particular phase before moving up, that’s fine. If a phase seems too easy and you want to go straight to the next phase that’s also fine.

You can do these workouts using skipping/jump rope, or just doing jumping jacks/warrior jumps or by sprinting/jogging, or working on a stationary cycle or cross trainer. Whatever you prefer, aslong as you follow the work-to-rest intervals as indicated.

Phase 1 (1:2): Weeks 1-2
Time/Activity:
-30 seconds High-Intensity Exercise
-60 seconds Rest or Low-Intensity Exercise
-Repeat another 10 times, followed by a final 30-second high-intensity blast.
Total time: 17 minutes

Phase 2 (1:1): Weeks 3-4
Time/Activity
-30 seconds High-Intensity Exercise
-30 seconds Rest or Low-Intensity Exercise
-Repeat another 11 times, followed by a final 30-second high-intensity blast.
Total time: 18.5 minutes

Phase 3 (2:1): Week 5-6
Time/Activity
-30 seconds High-Intensity Exercise
-15 seconds Rest or Low-Intensity Exercise
Repeat another 25 times, followed by a final 30-second high-intensity blast.
Total time: 20 minutes

I recommend you train 5-6 days a week with 3-4 of those days being your HIIT training and the remaining days focusing on another lower intensity type of exercise. Always allowing yourself a recovery/rest day. It is very important not to over train.

Plan choice 2:
Distance running:
You can change your rest days to fit around you. This is just an example.
This time range takes you up to a regular 40miles a week, though it would still be fine to lower distances and give yourself extra rest days and only do 25-30miles a week depending on your fitness level.The key here is to get good quality sessions. It is better to only train 3-4 days at a higher quality than try and train the 6 days a week and not perform as well.
This plan is very intense and is the sort of plan runners use to train for half marathons and runs of the same kind so this is not a plan I’d expect you to follow all the time it is just to get you quick results in the time frame you specified.

Week 1:
Mon- 3 miles easy pace.
Tues- 3 miles, little faster than mon.
Weds- 3 miles, include 30 seconds sprint.
Thurs- 3 miles, off road running.
Fri- Rest Day
Sat- 3 miles, include some strides.
Sun- 4-5 miles, take it easy.

Week 2:
Mon- 3 miles, easy pace
Tues- 5 miles, steady on hilly course.
Weds- 4 miles, include 16 mins of
1min fast : 1min jog
Thurs- 4 miles, easy pace.
Fri- Rest Day
Sat- 3 miles, fast
Sun- 5-6 miles, easy pace

Week 3:
Mon- 4 miles, easy pace.
Tues- 5-6 miles, steady.
Weds- 4 miles, easy pace.
Thurs- 8 x 90secs fast : 90secs slow
Fri- Rest Day
Sat- Rest Day
Sun- 6-7 miles slow.

Week 4:
Mon- 6 miles, easy pace off road.
Tues- 7-8 miles, easy pace.
Weds- 6 miles, include bursts up hills.
Thurs- 3 mile easy jog.
Fri- Rest Day.
Sat- 5-6 miles on grass.
Sun- 7-8 miles, easy pace.

Week 5:
Mon- 6 miles, easy pace.
Tues- 6 miles.
Weds- 7-8 miles fartlek on grass.
Thurs- 3 mile jog.
Fri- Rest.
Sat- 5 miles, easy pace.
Sun- 3 mile warm up jog, then 5-6miles.

Week 6:
Mon- 3 miles easy pace.
Tues- 6-8 miles, easy pace.
Weds- 6-8 miles, slightly faster.
Thurs- 6 miles easy, include 1 mile at
Fast pace ( quick as you can).
Fri- Rest or 3 mile jog.
Sat- 4 miles easy pace.
Sun- 8-10 miles.

I am unable to fit the diet advice on here but feel free to email me if you need help with this. Remember diet is very important if not more important. So make sure you are following a balanced diet that is effective to your training. I hope I was of some help. Good Luck! ?

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