2014/02/4a6cf_exercise_default

Dyspnea during daily activities predicts all-cause mortality

Dyspnea, a sensation of breathlessness, during light daily activities can be used as an indicator of exercise intolerance and low fitness. According to a study on Finnish twins, persistent or developing dyspnea reveals an increased risk of death.

The prospective cohort study on Finnish twins revealed that all-cause mortality increased along the degree of dyspnea during the 28-year follow-up. In the study, twin individuals with persistent dyspnea (dyspnea noticed in 1975 and 1981) and dyspnea developers (dyspnea noticed in 1981) had an increased risk of death (hazard ratio [HR] 1.41, 95% CI 1.31-1.52 and 1.16, 1.05-1.25 respectively) compared to asymptomatic individuals. Easy shortness of breath also indicated an increased risk of death among individuals considered healthy at the 1981 baseline.

To eliminate genetic background effects, within-pair analyses were conducted among pairs that were discordant for dyspnea and mortality rate. These analyses showed an increased risk of death also among discordant pairs: twins with persistent dyspnea had an increased risk of death compared to their asymptomatic co-twins (HR 1.47, 1.23-1.77). Respectively, a risk difference was seen in the pairwise analysis among healthy monozygotic twin pairs discordant for dyspnea (HR 2.64, 95% CI 1.21-5.74).

The study was a collaborative effort of the universities of Jyväskylä and Helsinki and was conducted among all same-sex twin pairs born in Finland before 1958. Dyspnea was measured with a modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) scale. The scale includes four questions on the degree of dyspnea when walking and performing daily tasks (e.g. do you usually get short of breath when you walk uphill, climb stairs, when walking on level ground). The level and change in dyspnea between 1975 and 1981 were used to predict mortality during a 28-year follow up (between 1981 and 2010). In total 21,379 twin individuals (including 8,672 complete twin pairs) were studied.

Our study shows that persistent dyspnea (breathlessness) predicts increased mortality during a 28-year follow-up even among individuals without a clinically overt disease known to associate with dyspnea. Based on the results, we believe that the dyspnea score, which can be easily obtained and correlates with fitness outcomes, could be a screening tool for identifying unfit individuals at an increased mortality risk.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Original story here.
Fitness News — Sciencedaily
— Courtesy “Science News Daily” (ScienceNewsDaily.com) <p>

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Comments

    • Gene Ryudan
    • February 24, 2014
    Reply

    best tae bo i like you <3

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    • Yvetta Ästhetik
    • February 24, 2014
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    I like it.
    Kiss

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    • Dustin Canton
    • February 24, 2014
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    love love love it <3

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    • c'est Caroo
    • February 24, 2014
    Reply

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    • Ruby Styer
    • February 24, 2014
    Reply

    We did this in gym class. At least the first 2 min.

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    • February 24, 2014
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    • Irena Feuereislová
    • February 24, 2014
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    Good workout, but its too short! :-/

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    • tjuci87
    • February 24, 2014
    Reply

    10 min warm-up, 20 min workout, 10 min stretch and strange movements with
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    • gaiasmommy
    • February 24, 2014
    Reply

    I Iike this workout, but the counting drives me nuts.

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    • Maha Alhajee
    • February 24, 2014
    Reply

    it was amazing exercise before going to work, I felt the stress was removed
    n ready to go to work. thank you so much

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    • February 24, 2014
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    A Lovely workout link.

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    • February 24, 2014
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    Show

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    • Jamaya Jefferson
    • February 24, 2014
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    I LOVED IT ”GREAT WORKOUT” !!!!

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    • Veronica Cruz
    • February 24, 2014
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    me encanta ,gracias !!

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    • Jamaci Queiroz
    • February 24, 2014
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    • Daiana Santos
    • February 24, 2014
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    • Tatiane Machado
    • February 24, 2014
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    • inspiration771995
    • February 24, 2014
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    IM GETTING IT IN had to stop but i will not give up WHEW

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