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Adoption Of Healthy Lifestyle Low By Individuals With Cvd

[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 16-Apr-2013 [ | E-mail[1] | Share Share[2] ]

Contact: Susan Emigh emighs@mcmaster.ca 905-525-9140 The JAMA Network Journals[4] [3]

Among patients with a coronary heart disease or stroke event from countries with varying income levels, the prevalence of healthy lifestyle behaviors (such as regular physical activity, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking) was low, with even lower levels in poorer countries, according to a study in the April 17 issue of JAMA.

“Observational data indicate that following an acute coronary syndrome, those who adhere to a healthier lifestyle have a lower risk of recurrent events. Smoking cessation is associated with a lower risk of death and myocardial infarction [heart attack], high-quality diets and regular exercise are associated with lower risk of death or recurrent cardiovascular disease events after a myocardial infarction. Thus, avoidance of smoking or its cessation, improving diet quality, and increasing physical activity level are recommended for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease,” according to background information in the article. “The proportion of the estimated 100 million individuals worldwide who have vascular disease in the community, especially from lower-income countries, living in rural areas, and who adopt healthy lifestyle behaviors is not known.”

Koon Teo, M.B., Ph.D., of McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and colleagues examined the prevalence of avoidance or cessation of smoking, eating a healthy diet, and undertaking regular physical activities by individuals with a coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke event. The Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) was a large, prospective study that used an epidemiological survey of 153,996 adults, 35 to 70 years of age, from 628 urban and rural communities in 3 high-income countries (HIC), 7 upper-middle-income countries (UMIC), 3 lower-middle-income countries (LMIC), and 4 low-income countries (LIC), who were enrolled between January 2003 and December 2009. The main outcome measures for the study were smoking status (current, former, never), level of exercise (low, moderate, or high, as gauged by metabolic equivalent task [MET]-min/wk), and diet (classified by the Food Frequency Questionnaire and defined using the Alternative Healthy Eating Index).

Of the 153,996 enrolled participants, 7,519 (4.9 percent) had a CHD or stroke event. The median (midpoint) interval from event to study enrollment was 5.0 years for CHD and 4.0 years for stroke. Among the 7,519 individuals with self-reported CHD or stroke, 18.5 percent continued to smoke; 35.1 percent undertook high levels of work- or leisure-related physical activity, and 39.0 percent had healthy diets.

“Among the participants who had ever smoked, 52.5 percent had stopped smoking; the prevalence of smoking cessation was highest in the high-income countries (74.9 percent) and lowest in the low-income countries (38.1 percent), with graded decreases by decreasing country income status (56.5 percent in upper-middle-income countries and 42.6 percent in lower-middle-income countries),” the authors write. “Low-income countries had the lowest prevalence who had healthy diets (25.8 percent) compared with the prevalences in high-income countries (43.4 percent), upper-middle-income countries (45.1), and lower-middle-income countries (43.2 percent).”

The researchers add that overall, 14.3 percent of individuals did not have any of the 3 healthy lifestyle behaviors; 42.7 percent had only 1 healthy behavior, 30.6 percent had 2, and only 4.3 percent had all 3 healthy lifestyle behaviors.

Levels of physical activity increased with increasing country income but this trend was not statistically significant.

“These variations in lifestyle prevalence can provide insights into opportunities to enhance cardiovascular disease prevention through adopting healthy lifestyle behaviors,” the authors write. “High-income countries had more comprehensive approaches to tobacco control (e.g., education on tobacco, smoking cessation programs, and active taxation and legislative measures), which likely account for the higher cessation rates.”

“Our data indicate that the prevalence of following the 3 important healthy lifestyle behaviors was low in individuals after their CHD or stroke event. These patterns were observed worldwide but more so in poorer countries. This requires development of simple, effective, and low-cost strategies for secondary prevention that is applicable worldwide.”

###

(JAMA. 2013;309(15):1613-1621; Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com[5])

Editor’s Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

There will also be a digital news release available for this study, including the JAMA Report video, embedded and downloadable video, audio files, text, documents, and related links. This content will be available at 3 p.m. CT Tuesday, April 16 at this link.

[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail[6] | Share Share[7] ]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 16-Apr-2013 [ | E-mail[8] | Share Share[9] ]

Contact: Susan Emigh emighs@mcmaster.ca 905-525-9140 The JAMA Network Journals[11] [10]

Among patients with a coronary heart disease or stroke event from countries with varying income levels, the prevalence of healthy lifestyle behaviors (such as regular physical activity, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking) was low, with even lower levels in poorer countries, according to a study in the April 17 issue of JAMA.

“Observational data indicate that following an acute coronary syndrome, those who adhere to a healthier lifestyle have a lower risk of recurrent events. Smoking cessation is associated with a lower risk of death and myocardial infarction [heart attack], high-quality diets and regular exercise are associated with lower risk of death or recurrent cardiovascular disease events after a myocardial infarction. Thus, avoidance of smoking or its cessation, improving diet quality, and increasing physical activity level are recommended for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease,” according to background information in the article. “The proportion of the estimated 100 million individuals worldwide who have vascular disease in the community, especially from lower-income countries, living in rural areas, and who adopt healthy lifestyle behaviors is not known.”

Koon Teo, M.B., Ph.D., of McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and colleagues examined the prevalence of avoidance or cessation of smoking, eating a healthy diet, and undertaking regular physical activities by individuals with a coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke event. The Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) was a large, prospective study that used an epidemiological survey of 153,996 adults, 35 to 70 years of age, from 628 urban and rural communities in 3 high-income countries (HIC), 7 upper-middle-income countries (UMIC), 3 lower-middle-income countries (LMIC), and 4 low-income countries (LIC), who were enrolled between January 2003 and December 2009. The main outcome measures for the study were smoking status (current, former, never), level of exercise (low, moderate, or high, as gauged by metabolic equivalent task [MET]-min/wk), and diet (classified by the Food Frequency Questionnaire and defined using the Alternative Healthy Eating Index).

Of the 153,996 enrolled participants, 7,519 (4.9 percent) had a CHD or stroke event. The median (midpoint) interval from event to study enrollment was 5.0 years for CHD and 4.0 years for stroke. Among the 7,519 individuals with self-reported CHD or stroke, 18.5 percent continued to smoke; 35.1 percent undertook high levels of work- or leisure-related physical activity, and 39.0 percent had healthy diets.

“Among the participants who had ever smoked, 52.5 percent had stopped smoking; the prevalence of smoking cessation was highest in the high-income countries (74.9 percent) and lowest in the low-income countries (38.1 percent), with graded decreases by decreasing country income status (56.5 percent in upper-middle-income countries and 42.6 percent in lower-middle-income countries),” the authors write. “Low-income countries had the lowest prevalence who had healthy diets (25.8 percent) compared with the prevalences in high-income countries (43.4 percent), upper-middle-income countries (45.1), and lower-middle-income countries (43.2 percent).”

The researchers add that overall, 14.3 percent of individuals did not have any of the 3 healthy lifestyle behaviors; 42.7 percent had only 1 healthy behavior, 30.6 percent had 2, and only 4.3 percent had all 3 healthy lifestyle behaviors.

Levels of physical activity increased with increasing country income but this trend was not statistically significant.

“These variations in lifestyle prevalence can provide insights into opportunities to enhance cardiovascular disease prevention through adopting healthy lifestyle behaviors,” the authors write. “High-income countries had more comprehensive approaches to tobacco control (e.g., education on tobacco, smoking cessation programs, and active taxation and legislative measures), which likely account for the higher cessation rates.”

“Our data indicate that the prevalence of following the 3 important healthy lifestyle behaviors was low in individuals after their CHD or stroke event. These patterns were observed worldwide but more so in poorer countries. This requires development of simple, effective, and low-cost strategies for secondary prevention that is applicable worldwide.”

###

(JAMA. 2013;309(15):1613-1621; Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com[12])

Editor’s Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

There will also be a digital news release available for this study, including the JAMA Report video, embedded and downloadable video, audio files, text, documents, and related links. This content will be available at 3 p.m. CT Tuesday, April 16 at this link.

[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail[13] | Share Share[14] ]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

References

  1. ^ E-mail (www.eurekalert.org)
  2. ^ Share (www.addthis.com)
  3. ^ emighs@mcmaster.ca (www.eurekalert.org)
  4. ^ The JAMA Network Journals (www.jamamedia.org)
  5. ^ http://media.jamanetwork.com (media.jamanetwork.com)
  6. ^ E-mail (www.eurekalert.org)
  7. ^ Share (www.addthis.com)
  8. ^ E-mail (www.eurekalert.org)
  9. ^ Share (www.addthis.com)
  10. ^ emighs@mcmaster.ca (www.eurekalert.org)
  11. ^ The JAMA Network Journals (www.jamamedia.org)
  12. ^ http://media.jamanetwork.com (media.jamanetwork.com)
  13. ^ E-mail (www.eurekalert.org)
  14. ^ Share (www.addthis.com)

Original Story Here

Resources:

Be Well On Your Way: Journey to a More Authentic You (Paperback) tagged “healthy lifestyle” 88 times

Wed, 10 Nov 2010 00:25:58 GMT Be Well On Your Way: Journey to a More Authentic You Be Well On Your Way: Journey to a More Authentic You (Paperback)By Maiysha T Clairborne MD Click for more info Customer Rating: 5.0 Customer tags: mind body spirit(90), self-help(90), empowerment(89), personal growth(88), healthy lifestyle(88), health(88), healthy living(85), healthy life(85), personal development(81), relationships(79), self esteem(35), self-improvement(35) http://www.amazon.com/Be-Well-Your-Way-Authentic/dp/1453614095/ref=tag_rso_rs_edpp_url?ie=UTF8&creative=381421&tag=thedays-20

Life On Your Terms: 7 Steps To a More Empowered You (Paperback) tagged “healthy lifestyle” 88 times

Wed, 26 Jan 2011 03:27:19 GMT Life On Your Terms: 7 Steps To a More Empowered You Life On Your Terms: 7 Steps To a More Empowered You (Paperback)By Maiysha T Clairborne MD Click for more info Customer Rating: 5.0 Customer tags: self-help(91), empowerment(89), health(89), healthy living(88), healthy lifestyle(88), healthy life(87), personal development(86), mind body spirit(86), personal growth(84), relationships(81), self-improvement(41), self esteem(40) http://www.amazon.com/Life-On-Your-Terms-Empowered/dp/1453615040/ref=tag_rso_rs_edpp_url?ie=UTF8&creative=381421&tag=thedays-20

Teen Mentors Best Adults in Steering Kids Toward Healthy Lifestyle …

Elementary school kids who learned about obesity from teen mentors lost weight, lowered their blood pressure and took on healthy lifestyle changes, according. http://psychcentral.com/news/2013/04/21/teen-mentors-successful-in-leading-children-toward-a-healthy-lifestyle/53956.html

Restaurant Will Focus on Healthy Lifestyle – Deerfield, IL Patch

Commitment to a healthy life and environment motivate Deerfield's newest restaurateurs. http://deerfield.patch.com/articles/restaurant-will-focus-on-healthy-lifestyle

The Dorm Room Diet : The 10-Step Program for Creating a Healthy Lifestyle…

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Comments

  1. Reply

    Why Is A Healthy Lifestyle Important In School? I need some ideas about Why a healthy lifestyle is important in school. I have to have an answer in less than 1000 words. Applying for college scholarship. Thanks in advance!

    View Comment
      • HealthNut
      • April 26, 2013
      Reply

      You need a healthy lifestyle in school to concentrate on your studies. You need to be able to focus for one thing. You also need to plenty of rest, and a good diet.

      View Comment
  2. Reply

    What Exactly Is A Healthy Lifestyle And Is It The Same For Everyone? Does a healthy lifestyle depends on a person’s age, religion, etc?

    View Comment
  3. Reply

    How Will You Maintain A Healthy Lifestyle In The Future? Imagine yourself after college. You’re married with a few kids. You’re gaining a few pounds every now and then. How will you get yourself back on track into a healthy lifestyle?

    View Comment
      • HealthNut
      • April 26, 2013
      Reply

      Minus the after college part, but I have 2 kids and am expecting the third one in a few weeks. We maintain healthy lifestyles by eating nutritious foods, lots of whole grains, fruits, veggies, and milk. We also get a lot of exercise in. Although my kids are still toddlers and I’m big as a house, everyday as a family my husband and I walk with the kids up and down the road, then when we get home my husband stays outside with the kids and plays with them while I get supper fixed. We don’t turn the TV on until after baths, forcing us to get up off the couch. Hopefully that will encourage our kids to maintain healthy lifestyles after they’re all grown up.

      View Comment
  4. Reply

    What Can Anyone Do To Promote A Healthy Lifestyle? What can institutions such as schools do and what can individuals do?
    What can the government put in place?
    What is the reason for the fact not a lot of people care about having a healthy lifestyle anymore?

    View Comment
      • HealthNut
      • April 26, 2013
      Reply

      Schools can replace all or most of the canteen food with healthy options so they could replace chicken burger with tuna salad for example. Individuals can aim to eat 5 portions of fruit and veg a day and exercise for at least 30 minutes a day. The government can put a higher price up on junk food, therefore tempting more people to buy healthy food as it would become cheaper than it is now.

      The reason why people don’t care about a healthy lifestyle, is that junk food like burger and chips is quick and a convenience, as healthy meals takes time to prepare. Same with exercise maybe being time consuming and they have a busy schedule to be able to fit it all in.

      View Comment
  5. Reply

    How Do You Maintain A Healthy Lifestyle? Please comment on your suggestions to maintain a healthy lifestyle, add any concerns or issues you have concerning you’re healt, and i’ll be happy to educate you further.

    View Comment
      • HealthNut
      • April 26, 2013
      Reply

      I eat healthy – vegetables, fruit, lots of water, minimal sugar consumption, etc.
      I don’t smoke.
      I don’t drink in excess.
      I don’t do drugs.
      I exercise at least twice a week.
      I try to get enough sleep every night (minimum of 7 hours).

      View Comment
  6. Reply

    What Would You Say A Healthy Lifestyle Is? Hey 🙂 I’ve got some coursework that needs doing and I need to do some primary reasearch and I was just wondering if you would leave me some answers below on what you think a healthy lifestyle is personally. And what you think you have to do to maintain a healthy lifestyle. I need loads of answers so I hope you dont mind helping me 🙂 Thankyouu

    View Comment
      • HealthNut
      • April 26, 2013
      Reply

      Healthy lifestyle…involves eating right, exercing, and relationships you have with others. Also if you live in a clean environment…messy=germs=sickness…and to maintain a healthy lifestyle you need to frequenlty eat right, do some sort of physical activity, be nice to others (stress is bad for health), and keep a clean home

      View Comment
  7. Reply

    How Do You Stay Commited To Your Healthy Lifestyle? I’m trying have a healthy lifestyle and lose weight but i’m finding it hard to commit.

    View Comment
      • HealthNut
      • April 26, 2013
      Reply

      Are you sure you want to lose weight? If this a true desire, give it two weeks, and then asses how you feel. If you are eating healthy and exercises you will feel the difference, then if you go back to living unhealthfully you will be able to tell the change in how you feel, then you should be able to make an easy desicion.

      View Comment

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