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Have COPD? Are you at increased risk for respiratory compromise?

Have COPD? Are you at increased risk for respiratory compromise?

(BPT) – Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death in the United States. What many people don't know is that COPD is a risk factor for a potentially deadly condition called respiratory compromise which can occur during hospitalization.

While relatively unknown, respiratory compromise can cause a patient's breathing to deteriorate, leading to respiratory failure and death. In addition to causing a downward decline into respiratory failure, respiratory compromise is the second leading avoidable patient safety issue and is as common as cardiac complications following noncardiac surgery. This condition can be caused by a number of factors, including pre-existing diseases and conditions such as COPD, or receiving opioid painkillers or sedatives for a procedure.

Although respiratory compromise is a serious health concern, it is often preventable. By using patient monitoring technologies and appropriate therapies to continuously assess a patient's respiratory status, healthcare professionals can help detect and treat patients earlier, which may help prevent further decline.

Health & Fitness

This past November marked National COPD Awareness Month, an annual observance aimed at elevating patient and physician recognition of COPD. The National Cancer Institute, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the American Association for Respiratory Care are among the many organizations working to raise awareness about COPD.

"Individuals living with COPD must realize their increased risk for respiratory compromise, a condition, which, if not caught early, can be fatal," said Phil Porte, Executive Director, Respiratory Compromise Institute. "Fortunately, many medical facilities already have the necessary tools to detect respiratory compromise early to allow for proper treatment. This is why it is important for those living with COPD to talk to their healthcare provider about their increased risk for respiratory compromise if they need to undergo a medical or surgical procedure, particularly those procedures that can worsen COPD symptoms."

If you have COPD, you should familiarize yourself with your risk for respiratory compromise, as well as the other risk factors -- such as advanced age, obesity and sleep apnea -- which can increase your likelihood of suffering from this condition. To learn more about respiratory compromise, visit http://www.respiratorycompromise.org/.


Brandpoint – Free Online Content

* Spirometry is a test of how well you can breathe and can help in the diagnosis of different lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

The test requires taking in a very deep breath and blowing out as fast as possible into a small device called a spirometer.

Watch the video to learn how to take a test (this video was filmed at the 2009 European Respiratory Society annual congress in Vienna, Austria, courtesy of x-audio/soundbakery).

Get your lungs tested for free on World Spirometry Day in 2014 as part of Healthy Lungs for Life: www.healthylungsforlife.org

Spirometry: how to take a lung function test Spirometry: how to take a lung function test

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Comments

    • gamma21285
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    If you test at this test then chances are you're not doing it right, given you know you don't have any issues with your lungs

    View Comment
    • عبدالرحمن السويركي
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    name of device in amazon?

    View Comment
    • Lawrence St John
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    I had one today

    View Comment
    • Bader AlHashem
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    Is that Amy Schumer?????

    View Comment
    • tony capotosta
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    I failed this test today. I'm a 26 yo male in good shape. I participate in regular cardiovascular exercises. I can run a mile in 7 min. I'm having problems breathing out to the last few seconds of the test. I'm not really sure why. I am doing it for a job process and have a chance to retake it. any advice or ways to improve it?

    View Comment
    • GREGORY HOLLIDAY
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    HAVING THIS TEST TODAY..THIS REALLY HELPS..THANKS..!! GREG..

    View Comment
    • Yichen Wang
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    Is this a peak flow meter test or a spirometry?

    View Comment
    • zak zaki
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    thank's

    View Comment
    • Ty Osborne
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    By far the stupidest test. Thanks for costing me my job

    View Comment
    • John Peter
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    EVERY TOURIST WHO GOES TO AMERICA TO STUDY IN COLLEGE HAS TO PASS A LUNG TEST AND I PASSED THE LUNG TEST

    View Comment
    • Steve
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    Is the nose clip important and if so how much would it effect the test without one.

    View Comment
    • John Holmes
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    Hot Swedish chic!!

    View Comment
    • Kimo Quit smoking
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    Very Good pic of test

    View Comment
    • miranda whitehead
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    i did it wrong and i don't get it

    View Comment
    • Rick Rude
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    Did anyone notice that she is HOT!

    View Comment
    • Sherida Sartin
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    If you take this very test but it never goes higher than 3 is that good or bad?

    View Comment
    • Lelisa Gada
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    I need circuit diagram for this project!

    View Comment
    • cinemuse7042
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    The patient would be standing in real life.

    View Comment
    • David Park
    • December 8, 2016
    Reply

    The patient would be standing in real life.

    View Comment

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