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Wedding Day Workout!

Wedding Day Workout!

2014 is the summer of lovin’, as a number of celebrities have recently said ‘I do.’

Jessica Simpson showed off her newly svelte figure as she walked down the aisle to wed her longtime boyfriend, Eric Johnson. Adam Levine married his model sweetheart Behati Prinsloo. And, Katie Couric wed her financier boyfriend John Molner.

Celebrities often have a team of fitness gurus to ensure their bodies are always camera-ready. Yet, that doesn’t mean A-list brides, just like us regular folks, don’t kick up their workouts a notch.

Healthy Skin Needs The Nutrition Of Vitamins And Minerals

Aromatherapy Essential Oils ~ Natural Perfume Absolute Oils ~ Beauty Skin Care We all want to look our best. Healthy skin makes us look younger and makes us feel more beautiful. In addition to the cosmetic benefits of healthy skin there are other health benefits to consider. Our skin was designed to be a protective barrier to keep bacteria, viruses and other contaminants from entering the body. Eating healthy is a great start to keeping your skin healthy but adding vitamins and mineral supplements act as insurance.

Free-radical damage occurs in skin just like every other part of our bodies. Anti-oxidant vitamins, like vitamin A, C and E are essential in warding off this damage. One of the types of free radical damage is the

Election surprises tend to erode trust in government

Election surprises tend to erode trust in government

When asked who is going to win an election, people tend to predict their own candidate will come out on top. When that doesn’t happen, according to a new study from the University of Georgia, these “surprised losers” often have less trust in government and democracy.

And the news media may be partly to blame, according to Barry Hollander, author of the study and UGA professor in the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Strategy proposed for preventing diseases of aging

Strategy proposed for preventing diseases of aging

Medicine focuses almost entirely on fighting chronic diseases in a piecemeal fashion as symptoms develop. Instead, more efforts should be directed to promoting interventions that have the potential to prevent multiple chronic diseases and extend healthy lifespans.

Researchers writing in the journal Nature say that by treating the metabolic and molecular causes of human aging, it may be possible to help people stay healthy into their 70s and 80s.

6 Moves for a Stronger Core

6 Moves for a Stronger Core

We have all seen countless ads for exercise programs that promise a “flat belly.” Unfortunately, the promise of a flatter abdomen misses the mark when it comes to a fit mid-section, which functions to support your spine and promote good posture, among other things. In fact, upon further consideration, a flat belly isn’t really what most of us desire because it doesn’t account for a healthy core and the muscular development that goes along with it. An effective workout program for the mid-section consists of a targeted approach for all of the muscles surrounding the trunk and results in defined, functionally appropriate core musculature. When combined with a balanced diet and a comprehensive fitness plan, the following exercises provide a multi-directional strategy for working the muscles of abdomen and back, which will give you the waist you both want and need. Perform these moves for 10 to 16 repetitions each, three times a week.

Why consumers choose high-effort products

Why consumers choose high-effort products

Consumers often face situations that undermine their feelings of control.

According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, when a person’s sense of control is threatened, they are mo re likely to seek out products that require hard work.

“Intuitively, it would seem that feeling a loss of control might cause consumers to seek out a product that does not require them to exert very much effort. But we find that consumers actually look to products that require hard work to restore their belief that they can drive their own positive outcomes,” write authors Keisha M. Cutright (Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania) and Adriana Samper (Arizona State University).

Parents rank their obese children as ‘very healthy’

Parents rank their obese children as 'very healthy'

A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine-led study suggests that parents of obese children often do not recognize the potentially serious health consequences of childhood weight gain or the importance of daily physical activity in helping their child reach a healthy weight.

The study is published online in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

“Parents have a hard time changing their child’s dietary and physical activity behaviors,” said lead author Kyung Rhee, MD, and an assistant adjunct professor in the Department of Pediatrics. “Our study tells us what factors may be associated with a parent’s motivation to help their child become more healthy.”


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